Fire danger causes Nissan to recall over 450,000 vehicles

DETROIT (AP) — Nissan is recalling over 450,000 vehicles worldwide because a brake fluid leak could cause them to catch fire. Because of the fire risk, the company is urging owners to park the vehicles outdoors and away from structures if the antilock brake light comes on for more than 10 seconds. The recall, detailed in documents posted Friday by the U.S. government, covers the Nissan Murano SUV from 2015 through 2018, and Maxima sedans from 2016 through 2018. Also included are Infiniti QX60 and Nissan Pathfinder SUVs from 2017 through 2019. Most are in the U.S. and Canada. Nissan says an antilock brake actuator pump can leak fluid onto a circuit board, causing electrical shorts and fires. Documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration didn’t say if there had been any fires or injuries in vehicles covered by the latest recall. A Nissan spokeswoman said she would look into the matter, and messages were left seeking details from NHTSA. It’s Nissan’s third recall for the same problem, and the company keeps expanding the number of affected models. About 120,000 U.S. vehicles were recalled in 2016, and Nissan issued a recall for 215,000 in 2018. A fire in a...

Nissan CEO should step down, but don’t lump him with Ghosn AN-LOGO-BLUE AN-LOGO-BLUE

Saikawa did not intentionally try to game the system, according to Nissan, and has said he will pay back the excess gains. TOKYO – Here’s an unpopular opinion that’s hardly being voiced but needs to be heard amid the seemingly ceaseless swirl of scandal engulfing beleaguered Nissan Motor Co. Despite being forced to resign under a cloud of controversy about his own compensation, outgoing CEO Hiroto Saikawa is not the villainous hypocrite many observers paint him out to be. From the moment it was revealed Saikawa improperly netted some $440,000 in stock-linked incentives, critics galore tried to tar him with the same brush as his former boss Carlos Ghosn. But there are important differences between Saikawa’s transgressions and Ghosn’s, if you believe the official narratives proffered by Nissan. Both men benefited from a misuse of an executive incentive scheme called share appreciation rights, but that’s where the similarities end. Saikawa did not intentionally try to game the system, according to Nissan, and has said he will pay back the excess gains. All told, he pocketed hundreds of thousands of dollars.  But Ghosn allegedly manipulated the system on purpose to reap bigger payo...