Catherine O’Hara on ‘Schitt’s Creek’ and the cult of Moira Rose: ‘I’m surprised by the whole thing.’

Over five seasons of “Schitt’s Creek,” Moira Rose has demonstrated, if nothing else, how to make an entrance. When the former soap opera star and newly elected councilwoman showed up for her first day of work (“What time is curtain?” is how she chose to greet her fellow council members), she wore a fur hat that had its own gravitational pull, and an adorned blouse fit for “Game of Thrones’” Night’s Watch. When Moira and husband Johnny (played by O’Hara’s longtime collaborator Eugene Levy) traveled to Amish country to track down their missing son, David, she delighted the locals with a decidedly un-modest pair of tights, a very short designer dress and a top hat perhaps borrowed from Slash. And to record a commercial for a winery, why wouldn’t she wear a Raf Simons PVC dress and gauntlet cuffs? It’s called being camera-ready. Earlier this month, when I met Catherine O’Hara — who plays Moira, the Rose family matriarch on the Pop TV/CBC series “Schitt’s Creek,” and has garnered an Emmy nomination as lead actress in a comedy series for her efforts — she was decidedly more dressed down: She was wearing a tailored white blouse by Anne Fontaine and black-and-white checked pants from Za...

Museum Tour: Ever wondered what homes looked like in the past?

Derived from the old English word ‘hus’, houses which mean dwelling units have existed since time immemorial. These have evolved manifold in terms of structure, design and material. It is important to note that houses are not just homes where family units reside but also a reflection of the geographical and weather conditions of a region, its native culture, customs, socio-economic conditions and above all, the psychologically prized possession of its owners. Here is a low down on some museums and open-air heritage centres where you can take a ‘traditional home trail’ to see how Indian houses were built. Dakshina Chitra Heritage Museum located 25 km from Chennai City Centre is an ode to the heritage, culture and crafts of South India. A highlight of this museum is a collection of a whopping 18 original houses that have been authentically reconstructed by the regional artisans themselves. This Tamil Nadu home section showcases how yesteryear merchants, brahmins, silk weavers, agriculturists as well as potters lived. Replete with courtyards, pillars and authentic artefacts and furniture, the houses have been replicated with not only the original doors and fittings but also the act...