It has been a year since the European Union implemented its General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a landmark privacy law aimed at curtailing the widespread use of personal information – without the full understanding or consent of the people concerned– for monetary gain, especially by major tech companies. What seemed bold and daring in 2018 is being emulated all over the world in 2019, and in some cases even promoted by the same tech companies which GDPR was initially meant to target. California, the home of Silicon Valley and epicenter of the data economy, approved a similar law last year that will go into effect in 2020. As these regulations proliferate, finance professionals will have to contend with an ever-increasing thicket of new compliance requirements when handling the data of consumers, clients and employees. But such regulatory changes should prompt more than just compliance concerns. There is a reason why data privacy and protection have become such important political issues and have generated widespread support for stricter regulations: at heart, companies’ misuse of data is a profound ethical issue. And due to their unique role in processing and analyzing da...