With a compound annual growth rate of 11.6%, the global laser market is expected to cross

With a compound annual growth rate of 11.6%, the global laser market is expected to cross $21 billion in the next five years and India will be main contributor to this growth. India has a 5% share of the more than $12 billion global laser market. With a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.6%, the global laser market is expected to cross $21 billion in the next five years and India will be main contributor to this growth (SIDEBAR, below). After 2012, the Indian laser cutting market grew tenfold, from 50 units per year to 500 units per year. Editor’s Note: Anant Deshpande, Industrial Laser Solutions Editorial Advisor for India and a contemporary of Rakesh Agarwal, offers these additional comments on the market for industrial lasers in this country. With prices for fiber laser cutting machines decreasing almost day by day, the market—which previously was focused on job shops—now includes companies making the products to have such machines in-house. The cost of the earlier machines was exorbitantly high and required trained manpower, so companies were outsourcing to job shops. However, with the drop in prices (a 1kW laser now costs under $50,000), these companies now hav...

When Fractal Design introduced its Define S chassis a little over three years ago, PCs—and indeed,

When Fractal Design introduced its Define S chassis a little over three years ago, PCs—and indeed, PC cases—looked a lot different than they do now. Power-supply shrouds were rare, and builders didn’t take any issue with a neat bundle of slack cabling zip-tied up in front of their PSUs. Since that time, most every case designer has embraced the shroud at every price point. A visible power supply and cabling these days is kind of like jorts: functional, but unfashionable. The space demands on the average case have changed, too. With the ever-greater density of hard drives and the increasing accessibility of NAS boxes, builders don’t need 10 local 3.5″ devices to reach 10 TB of storage in a system. They can just slap one big drive in there or plug in a Gigabit Ethernet cable to reach their disk array. SSDs don’t take up as much space as they used to, either. Builders rarely need to choose 2.5″ storage when even SATA SSDs can go right on the motherboard, and the majority of NVMe drives need an M.2 slot to work at all. Some elements of a system build aren’t so amenable to miniaturization, of course. Radiators can’t escape the laws of thermodynamics, for just one example, so lots of ...