Choosing what hue makes the list for the annual color of the year has become an

Choosing what hue makes the list for the annual color of the year has become an exciting tradition for many popular paint companies. In the past, we’ve been introduced to creamy neutrals, moody jewel tones, and punchy pops of color. Several factors go into consideration when picking a color of the year, including pop culture, architectural, and technological trends. This year feels extra special as we enter a new decade. The colors of the year could define how we look back on this period of design. Think about it: The ’80s had its splashy neon, the ’60s rocked pastels, and the ’90s, well, that could be defined by Monica and Rachel’s living room on Friends. See which colors the experts say are going to welcome us into 2020—we’ll keep a running tab of the colors of the year as they’re announced. Expect to see plenty of pink in the upcoming year. Benjamin Moore’s First Light 2102-70 is a soft shade of pink that continues the trend of rosy hues featured as 2020 colors of the year, including Valspar’s Bombay Pink and Romance by HGTV Home. The color reflects “a shift in mindset from the material to satisfying the core needs in life: community, comfo...

How a 19th-Century Workman’s Cottage Became a Family Home

In Gallatin, N.Y., the husband-wife co-founders behind the design firm Workstead converted a 1850s clapboard house into a rural idyll. The 1850s workman’s cottage, painted in Farrow & Ball’s Schoolhouse White, in Gallatin, N.Y. Stefanie Brechbuehler and Robert Highsmith added a chimney and small mudroom at the front entrance — the only changes to the footprint of the house.CreditCreditMatthew Williams For most couples, attempting a gut renovation of a historic home in a matter of months — while expecting twins — is a surefire recipe for disaster. But for Stefanie Brechbuehler and Robert Highsmith, the husband-and-wife co-founders of the Brooklyn-based design firm Workstead, the recent revamp of an 1850s residence in upstate New York not only presented them with a thrilling challenge, it also marked a celebratory homecoming after a few years spent living in the South. “New York, for us, is a return to the foundation of where we started our company and started our design language and our work — and now our family,” Highsmith told me one recent sunny morning as we strolled through the lush grass that surrounds the charming two-story clapboard home, a former workman’s cottage p...